Sunday, September 04, 2005

university of miami school of medicine bookstore


boston universtiy school of medicine


medical education in pa

promises of easy weight loss. (For most people, the only way to lose
weight is to eat less and exercise more.)
promises of a quick, painless, guaranteed cure
testimonials from satisfied customers. (These people may never have
had the disease the product is supposed to cure, may be paid
representatives, or may simply not exist. Often they're identified only
by initials or first names.)

university of maryland school of nuclear medicine

claims the product works by a secret formula. (Legitimate scientists
share their knowledge so their peers can review their data.)
publicity only in the back pages of magazines, over the phone, by
direct mail, in newspaper ads in the format of news stories, or 30-
minute commercials in talk show format. (Results of studies on bona
fide treatments are generally reported first in medical journals.)
claims the product is an amazing or miraculous breakthrough. (Real
medical breakthroughs are few and far between, and when they
happen, they're not touted as "amazing" or "miraculous" by any
responsible scientist or journalist.)